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What did Hetler Began Building on March 22

The topic of Hitler’s building projects is a complex and controversial one, as many of the structures he commissioned were built with forced labor and were part of his larger vision of a racially pure and dominant Germany. One of the most infamous building projects that Hitler began on March 22 was the construction of the Ordensburg Sonthofen, a Nazi training academy located in the Bavarian Alps.

 

Ordensburg Sonthofen: A Symbol of Nazi Ideology

The Ordensburg Sonthofen was designed to be a grand and imposing structure, reflecting the power and ideology of the Nazi party. The building was intended to serve as a training ground for the SS, the elite paramilitary organization that played a central role in Hitler’s regime. The academy was built in the style of a medieval castle, with towering walls, turrets, and a grand courtyard.

Construction on the Ordensburg Sonthofen began on March 22, 1934, and was completed in 1937. The project was overseen by the Nazi architect Hermann Giesler, who was responsible for many of the regime’s most prominent buildings. The construction of the academy was a massive undertaking, requiring the labor of thousands of workers, many of whom were forced to work in harsh and dangerous conditions.

 

A Monument to Nazi Ideology

The Ordensburg Sonthofen was more than just a training academy; it was a monument to the ideology and values of the Nazi party. The building was designed to instill a sense of loyalty and obedience in its students, who were expected to become the future leaders of the Nazi regime. The academy’s curriculum focused on military training, physical education, and ideological instruction, with a heavy emphasis on the importance of racial purity and the superiority of the Aryan race.

The Ordensburg Sonthofen was just one of several training academies that Hitler commissioned during his reign. These academies were intended to serve as the breeding grounds for a new generation of Nazi leaders, who would carry on the legacy of the party and ensure its continued dominance.

 

What happened on march 22, 1933 in Hitler’s life

What happened on march 22, 1933 in Hitler's life

On March 22, 1933, the first concentration camp built by Nazi Germany was established near the town of Dachau in Bavaria4. This event marked a significant turning point in the history of the Holocaust, as the National Socialists used an array of terror measures to establish a dictatorship in the German Reich. The Dachau concentration camp was one of the early sites used to facilitate the mass imprisonment of political opponents, with the first prisoner transports arriving on March 22, 19333.

The camp commandant, Theodor Eicke, introduced a system in October 1933 that included brutal punishment rules for the prisoners and duty orders for the camp SS. The regulations institutionalized SS rule over the prisoners, characterized by tyranny and terror3. The Dachau concentration camp served as a model for other concentration camps, with SS units taking charge of other camps up until then guarded by the SA. The “Dachau model” was imposed as the standard to be followed in all other concentration camps3.

In 1935, Adolf Hitler decided to utilize the concentration camp system as a permanent instrument of political terror, paving the way for promulgating a permanent state of emergency and installing despotic rule by the Gestapo. With the exception of the Dachau concentration camp, all early concentration camps were disbanded and new larger sites of incarceration were built. Besides opponents to the regime, more and more persons were imprisoned for reasons of racial ideology and “social hygiene,” including sexual and ethnic minorities like homosexuals and Sinti and Roma.

In 1937, work commenced on the expansion of the SS camp and the construction of a new prisoner camp with a capacity for 6,000 prisoners. The prisoners were forced to carry out the extremely strenuous building work. The decree on the “preventive fighting of crime by the police” from 1937 systematized arrest campaigns targeting persons, forming the basis for the mass arrests carried out the following year as part of the “work-shy Reich campaign”.

In 1938, after the occupation of Austria and the Sudetenland, thousands of political prisoners, Roma and Sinti, and Jews were deported to the Dachau concentration camp. Over the course of the November pogroms in 1938, almost 11,000 Jewish men were sent to the Dachau concentration camp. Physically abused, they were pressured by the SS into relinquishing their property and possessions and were forced to emigrate.

In 1939, the Second World War began on September 1, 1939, when German armed forces attacked Poland. At the end of September, the SS temporarily evacuated the prisoners’ camp at Dachau to use the grounds to militarily drill the SS “Death’s Head” Up until the spring of 1940 more than 5,000 prisoners were transferred to the Flossenbürg, Mauthausen, and Buchenwald concentration camps, where the conditions of their imprisonment dramatically worsened3.

From 1940 onwards, more and more prisoners were transported to the Dachau concentration camp from countries occupied by the German armed forces. Living conditions drastically worsened for the prisoners in the Dachau concentration camp. The murderous working conditions, the insufficient rations, and a lack of hygiene facilities in the camp led to a soaring death rate.

In 1941, after the German invasion of the Soviet Union in June 1941, the Dachau concentration camp was used as an execution site for Soviet prisoners of war. The Gestapo “segregated” members of the Red Army they identified as or considered to be intellectuals, Jews, or Communist officials from the rest of the prisoners, before handing them over to be shot by the camp SS. The mass executions were first carried out in the bunker courtyard on the camp grounds and then moved to the SS shooting range, where the SS murdered over 4,000 Soviet prisoners of war in 1941-42.

 

Forced Labor and the Construction of the Ordensburg Sonthofen

The construction of the Ordensburg Sonthofen was a massive undertaking, requiring the labor of thousands of workers. Many of these workers were forced to work in harsh and dangerous conditions, with little or no pay. The use of forced labor was a common practice in Nazi Germany, and it was a key component of the regime’s economic and industrial policies.

The workers who built the Ordensburg Sonthofen were primarily drawn from the ranks of the unemployed, the disabled, and other marginalized groups. They were housed in makeshift camps near the construction site, where they were subjected to strict discipline and harsh working conditions. Despite the risks and hardships, many of these workers were unable to escape the clutches of the Nazi regime, and they remained trapped in a cycle of forced labor and poverty.

 

The Legacy of the Ordensburg Sonthofen

Today, the Ordensburg Sonthofen stands as a stark reminder of the atrocities committed by the Nazi regime. The building has been repurposed as a German military academy, and it is now used to train soldiers in the art of warfare and the principles of democracy. Despite its dark past, the Ordensburg Sonthofen has become a symbol of hope and reconciliation, serving as a reminder of the importance of standing up to tyranny and oppression.

 

Conclusion

In conclusion, the Ordensburg Sonthofen was a significant building project that was initiated by Hitler on March 22, 1934. The academy was designed to serve as a training ground for the SS, and it was built in the style of a medieval castle, with towering walls, turrets, and a grand courtyard. The construction of the academy was a massive undertaking, requiring the labor of thousands of workers, many of whom were forced to work in harsh and dangerous conditions. Despite its dark past, the Ordensburg Sonthofen has become a symbol of hope and reconciliation, serving as a reminder of the importance of standing up to tyranny and oppression.

Read More: IS JET LI DEAD? UNRAVELING THE TRUTH

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